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For now, this page offers a basic guide to looking after your Glen's coat. The Glen Services website has a useful page describing how to groom and trim a Glen of Imaal Terrier and two breed clubs have produced grooming booklets:


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Grooming a Glen of Imaal Terrier ~ Written by Liz Gay (Malsville).

GITCA ~ Click on the breed club link and then scroll down to 'Emporium' to contact a committee member for further information about their grooming booklet.

Dutch Association for the Glen of Imaal Terrier ~ Click on the breed club link and scroll down to 'E-mail us your reaction' to contact the secretary for further information about their grooming booklet. (They also produce an English version).


Get your puppy used to being handled and groomed right from the start. Use a softer brush e.g. a pin brush and a comb, and do a few minutes of gentle brushing and combing every day.

Ideally, and especially if you are considering showing your Glen, the puppy coat should be stripped out at about three to four months of age. Try doing it yourself by gently pulling out the longer hairs with your fingers. Just ten minutes or so each day, preferably when your puppy isn't feeling too lively, will soon have the job done.

The adult Glen has a double coat, consisting of a soft undercoat and a harsh outer coat. Glens do not "shed" their coat but, like most other "coated" terriers, should be "stripped" once or twice a year, to allow new growth to come through. This involves "pulling" the old coat out from the neck, chest, back, sides and tail. (This doesn't hurt the dog)! Stripping can be done completely by hand, or using a stripping "knife". The head "furnishings" and the "feathers" on the legs and underneath should also be tidied; and the ears, feet and around the bottom need to be trimmed. If you don't want to strip your Glen yourself, you can always book an appoinmtent at your local doggy grooming parlour!

Regular brushing in between times, once or twice a week, should keep the coat tidy and free of knots. I prefer to use a bristle brush when they are newly stripped, as this is softer on the skin. A slicker brush, pin brush or comb are ideal to use on the longer coat, which can grow to a length of about 3", and a slicker brush or a comb for the head and legs.

"Clipping" is not recommended for Glens, as this will eventually affect the weather-proof quality of the coat, leaving the dog with just soft undercoat and no harsh, protective outer coat. However, if you are unable to strip your Glen yourself and your local groomer will only "clip", then do have your dog clipped once or twice a year. A clipped Glen will be much more comfortable than one that is just left to become a "hairy monster"; it will be cooler and less likely to develop uncomfortable matts and tangles.

Frequent bathing and shampooing is not necessary! This can soften the harsh coat and affect its weather-proof quality. If your Glen gets wet and muddy, allow the dog to dry off and the coat can then be easily brushed out.

Road-walking will help to keep your Glen's nails from becoming too long, but they will have to be clipped or filed every so often. Nail clippers can be purchased from most pet stores. If you are unsure of how to clip your dog's nails, ask your vet or your local dog groomer to show you. I prefer to file my dogs' nails and for this I use a cordless Dremel "MiniMite".

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